Stray and feral cats in queens boundary

We have an increasing population of stray cats. There are a number of ways that we can all help. If we tackle the problem now we can help keep our area major disease free and protect our own pets as well as the strays and ferals.

Firstly a reminder to all to please neuter you cat, both male and female, it can be done at your local vets and if you are on low income then free neutering can be done at participating vets, both Goddards in the village and Leyton midland participate in this scheme. More information can be found at http://www.cats.org.uk/c4/home.asp?url=c4

If you frequently see strays or ferals then you can help by observing them initially. Stray cats tend to be friendly and may look in better condition. Ferals are larger, not friendly ie very nervous of people and are more often out after dark. Both can benefit from being fed, it’s not their fault they are out there, irresponsible owners have caused this problem. If the cat is friendly but hungry you could borrow a cat carrier from a neighbour and take them to the vets to have them chip checked for free and hopefully return them to their rightful owner. Another option is to put a collar on the cat with a contact number taped to it, then the owner can let you know it is theirs and you don’t need to take to vets.

If you have tried this and feel the cat isn’t owned then there are a number of options: you might adopt the cat, ask neighbours if they are keen to adopt, catch the and have it neutered- strays and ferals can also be done for free as part of the C4 scheme (link above).
Catching a feral requires patience and likely use of a live trap that can be borrowed from charities including cats protection and the RSPCA. You’ll meed to do some homework to be successful and book at vets appointment in advance. More information and guidance can be provided by animal charities or see the post on queensboundary.wordpress.com for some top tips.

If one cat is un neutered and breeds and all the offspring remain un neutered and continue to breed, that one cat can produce up to 21,000 cats in seven years. Please do what you can to help. See our Facebook page for more information – queens boundary community.

Advertisements

Comments are closed.